Inspirated

 
 

August 23, 2011

Tarball generator for Git commits

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 12:56 am

While working for GSoC last year I kept track of Bazaar patches I sent in for Arsenal. This year I was using Git and as the need arose to generate a submission tarball for my commits I wrote this small utility script: git-generate-tarball.py.

To invoke the script, change into your Git repository and provide an author name and a file as an argument:

[krkhan@orthanc tor]$ /home/krkhan/Downloads/git-generate-tarball.py "Kamran Riaz Khan <krkhan@inspirated.com>" /home/krkhan/Downloads/tor-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz

generating tarball for commits between Mon May 23 00:00:00 2011 +0000 and Mon Aug 22 19:00:00 2011 +0000
generating patch for commit 5a801a8c8b71c9551a80913398135809cb10cecd

/home/krkhan/Downloads/tor-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz created

The default starting and ending dates for the commits correspond to the schedule for GSoC 2011. You can specify a starting date for the commits you want to be packaged using the --since argument:

[krkhan@orthanc arm]$ /home/krkhan/Downloads/git-generate-tarball.py --since="August 1, 2011" "Kamran Riaz Khan <krkhan@inspirated.com>" /home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.bz2

generating tarball for commits between August 1, 2011 and Mon Aug 22 19:00:00 2011 +0000
generating patch for commit 546ca73259d7863e3efe5e11e09c023c2790a2f6

/home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.bz2 created

Same goes for the --before argument:

[krkhan@orthanc tor]$ /home/krkhan/Downloads/git-generate-tarball.py --before="August 14, 2011" "Kamran Riaz Khan <krkhan@inspirated.com>" /home/krkhan/Downloads/tor-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz

generating tarball for commits between Mon May 23 00:00:00 2011 +0000 and August 14, 2011
generating patch for commit 5a801a8c8b71c9551a80913398135809cb10cecd

/home/krkhan/Downloads/tor-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz created

Or a combination of both:

[krkhan@orthanc arm]$ /home/krkhan/Downloads/git-generate-tarball.py --since="August 1, 2011" --before="August 14, 2011" "Kamran Riaz Khan <krkhan@inspirated.com>" /home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz

generating tarball for commits between August 1, 2011 and August 14, 2011
generating patch for commit 546ca73259d7863e3efe5e11e09c023c2790a2f6

/home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz created

If you want to leave the dates undefined you can leave the arguments empty. For example, the following command shall process all commits before June 1, 2011:

[krkhan@orthanc arm]$ /home/krkhan/Downloads/git-generate-tarball.py --since= --before="June 1, 2011" "Kamran Riaz Khan <krkhan@inspirated.com>" /home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz

generating tarball for commits before June 1, 2011
generating patch for commit 8b4dc162f75d5129e41f028c7253b7b265c8af76

/home/krkhan/Downloads/arm-gsoc-krkhan.tar.gz created

Hope this helps fellow GSoCers.

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August 12, 2011

Summer of Code Progress: Tor configuration

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 4:52 am
Summer of Code Archive Inspirated Code
Original Proposal Google Docs
PDF
Repository Tor Project Git
Mentor Blog arm Development Log

“O Marvelous! what new configuration will come next? I am bewildered with multiplicity.” — William Carlos Williams

Up until now my GSoC development was dealing with the “monitoring” aspects of arm. In addition to being a monitor a Tor controller is also supposed to, well, control the Tor client. Tor offers a detailed specification which can be used to interact with a running client and control it in a myriad of ways. This specification is then used by controllers like arm and Vidalia to fetch and/or update the client configuration.

The CLI configuration panel for arm already understood the control specification quite well. The first step towards reusing those portions for the GUI was to rewrite the inheritance code so that underlying data structures of the CLI were automagically connected to the Gtk+ models. That made the actual implementation of GUI configuration panel a whole lot cleaner. As things are, the panel detects the data types of configuration options and opens pertinent dialogs for user input:

Configuration panel for garm
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

Next item in to-do list was implementing a path selection panel in arm. After a thorough discussion on IRC with the core Tor developers it was decided that giving end-users complete access to the PathSupport component of TorCtl would ultimately hurt their anonymity with little (if any) pay-off. Letting them choose the country of their exit relay was still seen as a useful feature which is what I’m working on right now.

Meanwhile, while setting the configuration options needed to choose an exit country I figured that arm should be notified of any changes made by other controllers to the options in question. Damian pointed me to ticket #1692 which proposed an enhancement for this very purpose. He had already created a patch for the job but few quirks needed to be addressed before the patch was ready for being merged. Thanks to help from Nick Mathewson and Robert Ransom I was able to fix the code and get it inside the tor and tor-spec repositories.

To make use of the new CONF_CHANGED event I also wrote patches for TorCtl and Vidalia. The TorCtl patch shall help me in making arm aware of configuration changes. While the Vidalia one is a proof-of-concept which created a signal and connected it to a debug function which for the time being just logs the options changed for the running Tor instance.

I hope to be done with exit node selection within a couple of days after which I’ll port the feature to CLI version of arm. It’ll be a good little exercise to start decoupling the arm interfaces from its backend so that future development is more streamlined and fun.

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July 17, 2011

Summer of Code Progress: garm 0.1

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 5:16 pm
Summer of Code Archive Inspirated Code
Original Proposal Google Docs
PDF
Repository Tor Project Git
Mentor Blog arm Development Log

Damian and I have decided that the GUI prototype for arm should be released to the public for a feedback round. As always, the code is available from the Git repository.

So far, the graphs and logs now support a look more conforming with the rest of the GTK+ theme:

Graphs panel for garm 0.1
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

The connections panel lists circuits and control ports in use. The resolvers in use are in fact, the same ones used by the CLI so the results are pretty consistent:

Connections panel for garm 0.1
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

The “sticky” or “header” panel which provided general Tor/arm info has been moved to the notebook for giving it more horizontal space:

General panel for garm 0.1
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

Owing to my lack of creativity the GUI was named “garm”. Which coincidentally turned out to be the name of a talking dog from one of Tolkein’s short stories. Proving once again that Tolkein/Middle Earth/Norse mythology are any geek’s safe fallback plan for being imaginative.

While the GUI is still in infancy, we’d love any feedback we can get. If you have a suggestion you can post a comment here, drop by at #tor-dev or (preferably) mail your thoughts to tor-talk. I’ll be grateful for any ideas that end up making garm more useful for relay operators.

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July 9, 2011

Sharun’s first ever program: Kitty playing

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 3:19 pm

This morning I woke up to one of the most pleasant surprises I have had in years. I received an email from my 7-year old nephew:

Subject: my first program in scrach :)
Attached: kitty-playing.sb

Since I had never talked with him about Scratch before, I immediately wanted to know how much help he received from his parents for this achievement. In words of his mother: “We both tried Scratch first and then helped him. In fact in few things Sharun helped us to understand.” The fact that he is self-motivated to explore and learn about Scratch made me even more ecstatic about his work.

Here’s his code in action:

Screenshot of kitty playing in Scratch
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

Most of the people I’ve known as code-lovers remember their first ever computer programs. While my first program pales in comparison to the complexity and fun of Sharun’s Scratch creation, I do remember going crazy over the infinite loop. Here’s to hoping he doesn’t end up turning off his PC to put an end to:

10 PRINT "hello world"
20 GOTO 10

In any case, given that I was 14 at the time and my nephew is only half that age I cannot wait to see what he produces in the upcoming years.

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June 28, 2011

Summer of Code Progress: Graphs, logs and acid

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 7:06 pm
Summer of Code Archive Inspirated Code
Original Proposal Google Docs
PDF
Repository Tor Project Git
Mentor Blog arm Development Log

The great thing about a command line application is being able to SSH into the thing from anywhere and with anything. Nevertheless, the general public appeal of GUIs has always remained undeniable. After all, over the decades one of the favorite pass times of Steve Jobs — the man who knows a thing or two about public appeal — has been suing and/or getting sued for patents related to GUI. It’s not to say that we are planning an iTorMonitor for App Store (you still have iSSH if you’d like), but a graphical interface shall hopefully go a long way for attracting newbie relay operators.

The first items to be ported to GUI were the bandwidth graphs. After a thorough discussion on #tor-dev regarding how to achieve graphing with respect to feature sets, packaging issues and wheel reinvention; cagraph was chosen as the way to go (among Matplotlib and drawing directly to GDK surfaces). I took screenshots of both interfaces running side-by-side in order to judge how accurate the graphs were and the results look fine:

CLI bandwidth stats for arm

Down arrow

GUI bandwidth stats for arm
(Click on the thumbnails for larger version.)

Next up were the log messages dispatched by arm or Tor. While Damian would not be entirely happy with the fact that I’m not terribly innovative with the UI translation ;-) , I did stumble upon an interesting side-feature of using timestamp based sorting. The user can sort the entries in ascending order and he’ll always see the recent-most entry as it pops up in the view, or he can revert the order and see old entries at his leisure while the new entries populate elsewhere below.

Log panel for arm
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

One other aspect I noticed while designing the UIs was that I have atrocious color selection skills. The color scheme of the entire application isn’t consistent and might even invite a backlash once it goes public. Therefore I plan on discarding all hardcoded colors in favor of theme colors from GTK+ itself — lest the GUI be packaged into a separate arm-trippy once it makes to major distros.

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June 15, 2011

BBC World Have Your Say: Cyber War

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 2:53 am

Xavier graciously invited me to BBC’s Islamabad Studios again today for discussing the recent developments on the cyber crime landscape. You can listen to the podcast directly or use the player below to stream the audio:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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June 1, 2011

Summer of Code Progress: Cursing with Python

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 7:26 pm
Summer of Code Archive Inspirated Code
Original Proposal Google Docs
PDF
Repository Tor Project Git
Mentor Blog arm Development Log

The first thing that comes to mind after seeing “curses” and “Python” in the same sentence is “go away or I shall taunt you a second time”. After spending a while trying to write text-mode interfaces, it only starts ringing truer.

Coding period for Google Summer of Code 2011 officially began last week. Because of exams and some subsequent issues involving my university I had been lagging behind my intended schedule. With help from Damian Johnson though I was able to get my feet wet quickly and start integrating menus in arm. Luckily, the arm codebase was very well-written and neatly organized which simplified my task and allowed me to end up with a functional implementation by the end of first week:

Drop-down menus for arm
(Click on the thumbnail for larger version.)

The code can be accessed via my Git repository at Tor Project. In addition to that I also now own a shiny krkhan@torproject.org email address which is currently setup to forward messages to my primary mail.

Menus still needs a bit of polishing as the controls are not completely intuitive and I still need to bug-hunt thoroughly on varying screen sizes. For the time being they work well enough to control all aspects of arm except for quitting or resetting Tor, which I shall be fixing after figuring out a few quirks.

“As a child my family’s menu consisted of two choices: take it or leave it.” — Buddy Hackett

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May 11, 2011

Gnome 3, Unity and Xfce: The Mass Exodus

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 2:35 pm

“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to Xfce!”

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April 28, 2011

BBC World Have Your Say: Sony Playstation Network Hacked

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 4:12 am

I was invited to BBC’s Islamabad studios today to participate in their World Have Your Say program regarding Sony’s Playstation Network being hacked. It was really fun, and while I was a little nervous about going on-air live on BBC World Service I tried to explain the difference between PSN and console-homebrew hackers as well as the importance of educating the users about their security. You can listen to the podcast directly or use the player below to stream the audio:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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April 26, 2011

There and Back Again — Google Summer of Code 2011

Filed under: Blog — krkhan @ 3:43 am

GSoC 2011 Logo

After completing my project for last year‘s Summer of Code my degree was delayed for a while because of flunking a few courses. Glass half full, this gave me the chance to participate once more before I finally graduate this summer — Deo volente.

In a repeat of last year I once again became a duplicate student as my proposals for both Fedora and Tor projects ended up in top slots. Both organizations were really nice in the de-duplication process and inquired about my preference which inclined towards Tor since it allowed me to contribute to fields of privacy and anonymity. In words of Free Software Foundation:

Using free software, Tor has enabled roughly 36 million people around the world to experience freedom of access and expression on the Internet while keeping them in control of their privacy and anonymity. Its network has proved pivotal in dissident movements in both Iran and more recently Egypt.

This by no means implies any lesser significance for Fedora in my life and I would have been as much enthused had it been my mentoring organization for the summer instead of EFF. However, since I had to make a choice I went for the option where I would be contributing more directly to privacy enhancing technologies.

My project this summer revolves around improving the excellent Anonymizing Relay Monitor (arm) which is used by the Tor community to monitor and control bridges and relays. The complete proposal can be read here (or via the original PDF). It contains nitty-gritty details of my summer aspirations as well as non-technical stuff like why I want to contribute to this particular field.

I Know What I Did Last Summer, and I’m looking forward to doing it again. Quoting myself from FLOSS Manuals:

“Summer of Code is about much more than just code. The sheer fun of integrating with the open-source community and your mentoring organization can in fact outweigh the gratification of actual coding. “

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